City of Tucker gets $2.5 million grant for Johns Homestead Park

A map showing the location of Johns Homestead Park in Tucker. Image obtained via Google Maps

Tucker, GA — The city of Tucker has received a $2.5 million grant from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources for work at Johns Homestead Park, according to a press release.

The 53-acre park is located off Lawrenceville Highway. It features an 1820s homestead.

The grant was one of 15 approved by state lawmakers, the press release said. It will be used to fix the stormwater system and creating new trails, boardwalks and a fishing pier.

“Johns Homestead is home to two bioretention lakes, a wetland, a beaver pond and much more,” Parks and Recreation Director Rip Robertson said. “This grant will be integral in allowing us to improve, enhance and preserve these beautiful resources.”

Tucker intends to restore streambanks and buffers with native plants.

“For this effort, they will work with EcoAddendum, a non-profit organization committed to helping preserve the rich biodiversity and healthy environment of our region,” the press release says.

Friends of Johns Homestead Park and the Tucker-Northlake Community Improvement District helped the city to secure the grant. Friends of Johns Homestead Park will contribute $13,000 and 1,500 volunteer hours.

“One of the results of this important work will be to increase access and provide recreational amenities to attract users from throughout the region,” Beth Ganga of Friends of Johns Homestead Park said in the press release.“We are excited for everyone to see what we have in this gem of a park.”

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